Did they need IPP reports for that?

This rather remarkable piece was published in yesterday’s edition of The Guardian.

In two reports, the Institute of Public Policy Research joins union calls for compulsory standard assessment tests (Sats) at the end of key stage two and three to be abolished and replaced largely by a system of continuing teacher assessment. But it also argues for new measures to make schools and teachers accountable. The IPPR says too many schools are “teaching to the test” in an effort to boost their standing in league tables. Such short tests in the key subjects lead to “unreliable results”.

What is really remarkable about this is not that the IPP has come with the recommendation it has, but that this government needs an IPP report to tell it what the educational experts and people with experience of what is actually happening in schools have been saying all along. The fact the practice of   “teaching to the test” was widespread has been very well known for a long time.

Here is the late Ted Wragg writing for The Guardian in 2003.

The Sats industry makes education dreary and mechanical, and their influence on the curriculum is dangerously narrowing, as schools in city areas feel pressed into drilling children to death, too terrified about their low league-table position to innovate. The league tables should also be abolished. They tell virtually nothing about the quality of teaching in a school, and simply perpetuate and extend social polarization.

I suppose that Wragg’s relationship with the government was such that it was always on the cards that said government would ignore as much as it could of what he had to say on any given subject.

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Did they need IPP reports for that?

This rather remarkable piece was published in yesterday’s edition of The Guardian.

In two reports, the Institute of Public Policy Research joins union calls for compulsory standard assessment tests (Sats) at the end of key stage two and three to be abolished and replaced largely by a system of continuing teacher assessment. But it also argues for new measures to make schools and teachers accountable. The IPPR says too many schools are “teaching to the test” in an effort to boost their standing in league tables. Such short tests in the key subjects lead to “unreliable results”.

What is really remarkable about this is not that the IPP has come with the recommendation it has, but that this government needs an IPP report to tell it what the educational experts and people with experience of what is actually happening in schools have been saying all along. The fact the practice of   “teaching to the test” was widespread has been very well known for a long time.

Here is the late Ted Wragg writing for The Guardian in 2003.

The Sats industry makes education dreary and mechanical, and their influence on the curriculum is dangerously narrowing, as schools in city areas feel pressed into drilling children to death, too terrified about their low league-table position to innovate. The league tables should also be abolished. They tell virtually nothing about the quality of teaching in a school, and simply perpetuate and extend social polarization.

I suppose that Wragg’s relationship with the government was such that it was always on the cards that said government would ignore as much as it could of what he had to say on any given subject.


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