A policeman’s lot is not a happy one.

There is an interesting piece by the ever-reliable Simon Caulkin in the Business section of The Observer yesterday. Apparently, from his reading of the “account of one direct-response (ie local beat) policeman’s experience of life on the front line in ‘Newtown’, a settlement of 60,000 somewhere in the north of England (coppersblog.blogspot.com)”, Caulkin now believes the main hazards in a policeman’s  life “are not violence and organised crime, but police management – proliferating bureaucracy and the ranks of internal and external auditors who seem more interested in whether targets are met and procedures complied with than catching criminals.” 

For Caulkin’s full report, click Business.

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A policeman’s lot is not a happy one.

There is an interesting piece by the ever-reliable Simon Caulkin in the Business section of The Observer yesterday. Apparently, from his reading of the “account of one direct-response (ie local beat) policeman’s experience of life on the front line in ‘Newtown’, a settlement of 60,000 somewhere in the north of England (coppersblog.blogspot.com)”, Caulkin now believes the main hazards in a policeman’s  life “are not violence and organised crime, but police management – proliferating bureaucracy and the ranks of internal and external auditors who seem more interested in whether targets are met and procedures complied with than catching criminals.” 

For Caulkin’s full report, click Business.

A policeman’s lot is not a happy one.

There is an interesting piece by the ever-reliable Simon Caulkin in the Business section of The Observer yesterday. Apparently, from his reading of the “account of one direct-response (ie local beat) policeman’s experience of life on the front line in ‘Newtown’, a settlement of 60,000 somewhere in the north of England (coppersblog.blogspot.com)”, Caulkin now believes the main hazards in a policeman’s  life “are not violence and organised crime, but police management – proliferating bureaucracy and the ranks of internal and external auditors who seem more interested in whether targets are met and procedures complied with than catching criminals.” 

For Caulkin’s full report, click Business.


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